D – Decisive

D – Decisive

adj. Decisive having the power to decide; conclusive; characterised by decision and firmness; resolute; beyond doubt; unmistakable.^1

It’s better to be boldly decisive and risk being wrong than to agonise at length and be right too late.
– Marilyn Moats Kennedy

Not all decisions are equal or favoured by the majority.

We see the slings and arrows aimed at politicians, those in public office and high-profile decision makers. Leaders are in the spotlight.

 

Running on Autopilot?

Unless you’re an android in a sci-fi film, Google translator or my automated vacuum at home, robots can’t make decisions quite like us just yet. But don’t underestimate the rise of artificial intelligence through apps and machinery and leverage it where you can.

My vacuum cleaner methodically glides around the floor, bumping into walls and table legs, saving me hours over the course of the year with office cleaning. It’s one less decision I need to make so I can focus on the human connections and other supporting elements.

 

Delegated Authority

The type of role and responsibilities you are employed to undertake will determine the level of delegated authority you have and the gravity of decisions you may have to make. Refer to your employment contract for clear operational guidelines and seek clarity from your up-line or governing board at CEO level.

If you’re asking team members or strategic partners to follow you and you’re uncertain of your delegated authority or undermined by your up-line, then you may find yourself a little frustrated.

If you have direct reports working with you, then be sure that you’re clearly expressing their financial, communication and engagement authorities for maximum support and transparency.

 

Fatigue Impacts Decision Making

Can’t think straight? Fatigue lends itself to double-mindedness: the inability to think clearly and to make decisions. You need to take care of your brain. If you’re experiencing difficulty in this area, then you may need to undertake the following:

  • Create space in your work day for reflection and critical thinking.
  • Set the framework for decision-making, being clear on expectations, timeframes, and consequences.
  • Ask questions to clarify your understanding and to identify the underlying motivation for requests or any hesitation you encounter.
  • Embrace robust conversations and encourage your team to liaise with you. Recognise your own blind spots. Encourage debate and think tanks, question ideas and concepts, test and measure all while walking quietly confident in your authority.
  • Finding it tough? Get up and walk away. Hit the refresh button on your thinking before resuming the process. The saying ‘motion changes emotion’ refers to taking a short break from the task at hand. Get up and move around. You’ll return with a clearer head and better concentration.
  • Establish decision-making terms of reference to assist your ability to swiftly adapt or pivot when needed. Re-evaluate and implement troubleshooting strategies in order to communicate progress and achieve outcomes.

  • Develop a sound knowledge of operational policies, procedures, processes, and protocols. This will be critical to accurate decisiveness that upholds legislation and protects your employer from risk.

Imagine if your team and colleagues were all on the same page? Order Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader for Real Life@Work”. It’s designed with short sharp chapters and checklists to enhance your effectiveness, increase your confidence and get you home on time!

Danielle’s Story

Danielle was an extremely capable, senior executive who was carrying enormous responsibility when I began working with her. The company delivered real-time intervention for individuals battling depression and suicide. This pressure was impacting the whole C-suite in different ways.

Working with Danielle in an executive coaching capacity, we identified some immediate strategies to bring the management team together and key phrases to enhance communication. We also liaised with a representative of the board for insight and to promote a sense of safety for everyone.

Danielle liaised with the board of the national organisation, navigated the death of a colleague, safeguarded the compliance obligations and took steps to transition into a more sustainable role with an alternative firm.

Danielle was a compelling leader and her new boss declared her ‘a superstar’. Why? She identified continuous quality improvements. She also recognised the growth that comes from trying and the risks that posed a threat to people, property, and brand, while pursuing constructive relationships with colleagues, clients and community.

Are you like Danielle and make considerate decisions?

 

Leading Change

Leading change in the workplace and being the conduit between the board and the frontline service staff is one of the toughest positions to be in, particularly when the stakes are high. It requires gathering information, assessing the pros and cons, liaising and consulting with people who are vital stakeholders in the decision-making process.

Decisiveness is a double-edged sword. A leader who defers too often to other people’s opinion will lose the respect of key performers. In instances where the workplace culture is already complex, the leader who, after consulting, takes decisive action, may experience pushback from underground leaders and problem generators.

‘A compelling leader,’ notes firefighter Anthony Brewin, ‘has to be decisive. He must be able to admit fault and change when necessary.’ Decisiveness is not a popularity contest. Make your peace with that. As a compelling leader, you will have to consider the consequences, stand on your convictions and weather the storm.

 

Being Led Through Change and Finding It Difficult?

Change is awkward for some, particularly when you’ve been consulted and your opinion, having been heard, is not incorporated as the organisation moves forward. Here’s where you need to ask yourself some questions:

  • Do you get on board with the future direction the business is going in and keep a sweet spirit about it?
  • Do your values continue to align with the organisation’s? If they do, that’s fantastic and you need to decide to buy into this and align yourself to the new decision and direction.

 

Your Decisive Checklist

Empty your head before you leave the office each day, devoting 15 minutes to consistently complete the first two tasks.

  • Write down your achievements for the day or cross off tasks in your diary which had been accomplished.
  • Write down your objectives for tomorrow and list the opportunities and possible obstacles. Also note other stakeholders involved in the decision-making process.
  • Prioritise your goals and project objectives for medium- and long-term periods.
  • Keep the lines of communication open. Pursue clarity with your up-line and don’t shy away from the robust conversations necessary for the business to move forward.
  • In operational matters, particularly when senior management may be off-site, you must be clear on whether your role is to research or roll out decisions before committing to the completion of the task.
  • For medium- to long-term projects that require ongoing decisions, consider using tailored project management software to aid in this task. Keep relevant team members up to date on any action taken.
  • Stick to your timelines and say no to other requests if you have too much on your plate. Your ability to make decisions and complete tasks can become eroded by distractions. Learn how to diplomatically refuse a request and practice your negotiation skills.
  • If you have experienced trauma or have been working at an elevated level for a prolonged period of time, then you may find yourself depleted. Take time to rest and recharge. See your doctor if necessary.

Footnotes:
^1. The Free Dictionary by Farlex, decisive, http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ decisive

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

About the Author- Tarran Deane the Alphabet Principle Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader for Real Life at Work - Speaker, Keynote COnference Speaker, PCO Speaker, MICE Speaker, Bureau Speaker, Associations SpeakerTarran Deane is the Author of “The Alphabet Principle ~ Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader, for Real Life@Work”. With executive and leadership experience, covering more than 41,000 hours, across human services, workforce planning, associations and peak bodies, along with banking and tourism, Tarran has spoken at conferences and events in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the United States of America, on strategic and operational elements of Leadership, Communication, Change Management, Diversity, Inclusion and Engagements.

 

An executive Director of Corporate Cinderella Pty Ltd, Director of Gold Coast Charity, Newlife Care Inc, tarran is also a Director and the 2018 National President of Professional Speakers Australia.

As a wife, mum & step-mum, Tarran loves the tapestry of family life and recharges by serving others, chilling out and racing her Ducati 800 Monster through the hills of Northern NSW.

Imagine if your team and colleagues were all on the same page? Order Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader for Real Life@Work”. It’s designed with short sharp chapters and checklists to enhance your effectiveness, increase your confidence and get you home on time!

Recognise and Reward Publically

Recognise and reward others publicly and privately. Correct in Private.

I popped into the airconditioned McDonalds after Church recently. My husband was on shift, and I had an hour to pass before picking a colleague up from the nearby airport.

As I waited in line to place my coffee order I observed the supervisor, the busy drive-through, and smiled at the young cashier greeting the family in front of me, as the previous customers walked to their seats. People are an interesting study.

This isn’t about finding fault, but rather looking at ways we can ‘build each other up’ rather than unintentionally ‘tear them down’, be it in public or in private.

The Supervisor kindly delivered the previous customer’s completed order to their table, discovering the drink items weren’t on the docket she had on the tray. Wrong docket.

In the Supervisor’s haste to correct an oversight, she corrected the cashier in front of the new customers being served.

I could see the young cashier quietly retreating into herself as the red blush crept up her neck and my heart went out to her.

I wished the Supervisor had demonstrated an awareness that her comments had publically shamed this young worker.

There’s a better way to enhance a process bring about change, place value on others and demonstrate dignity.

 

 

 

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The author of “The Alphabet Principle ~ Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” Tarran has written a contemporary, real life@work book to help you flourish, bridging the divide between the rise of artificial intelligence and the rapid pace of change.

To work with Tarran visit www.tarrandeane.com and schedule a call today.

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B. Bosses – An Extract from The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader by Tarran Deane

B. Bosses

n. Bosses: individuals who are usually the immediate supervisors of a number of employees and have certain capacities and responsibilities to make decisions – the term itself is not a formal title and is sometimes used to refer to any higher-level employee in a company, including a supervisor, manager, director or the CEO.^1

 

A good boss makes his men realise they have more ability than they think they have so that they consistently do better work than they thought they could.

– Charles Erwin Wilson

Movies such as Horrible Bosses portray narcissistic, indulgent people using manipulation and intimidation to fill their own insecurities or workflow demands. Thank goodness I’ve never encountered one of those.

Brave Leaders

If you want to have an impact and get the job done, then you do have to make the tough calls, expect more from your people and rally the troops. Consultation does not abdicate decision-making. This in itself is enough to cause friction within even the healthiest workplaces! Navigating this tightrope can be tricky – and alienating.

 

Some of the Bosses I’ve had the privilege of working with demonstrated all or part of the following traits:

 

The Rule of 3-by-3

Compelling Bosses demonstrate a three-fold capability: Character, Commitment & Competency

  1. Character + Likeability + Lifestyle

In my first full-time job working at a regional branch of a major bank, I had three bosses. Boss A damaged me with inappropriate remarks in the stairwell and a hand that lingered too long. That was topped off when I saw him barefoot with hanging toenails walking through the local shopping centre. He had no self-respect and he’d shattered my perception of what a boss should be.

Boss B thought it was cool, last thing on a Friday, to have me put away a tray in the giant strong room, then close the door and spin the combo with no light on. I had no idea there was a light switch or a phone inside. I cried out and he laughed thinking it was the funniest joke.

And there was Boss C who was normal and not ‘out there’. He was reasonable and left you feeling ‘safe’ as you learned. He is one of the reasons I do what I do.

  1. Commitment + Networks + Legacy 

Going the extra mile is part and parcel of most jobs. In some countries, a maximum number of ‘ordinary hours’ you can work across a month is legislated to protect the rights of workers. In reality, life is a shifting canvas of trends and seasons. You’ll need to be here, be there, turn up and turn on to connect with people and nurture relationships.

  1. Competency + Financial Intelligence + Outcomes

Upskilling through formal and informal education, internal or external mentoring and coaching will prepare you to lead your team through different seasons. Love your stats, explore what they mean, quantify what you need and work the plan to achieve the outcomes that will move you closer to your goals.

There’s something compelling about a leader who is across the Rule of 3-by-3!

 

Imagine if your team and colleagues were all on the same page? Grab Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” When You Order it Here!

 

Accountable.me

Typically, the ‘buck stops here’ with bosses. Whatever the title is on your payslip, the burden of leadership remains whether you are a supervisor, manager, pastor, doctor, builder, farmer, CEO, duty nurse, owner, teacher, principal or SME owner.

Learning how to maintain transparency and honouring commitments while zig-zagging between workflow, boundaries and the life outside is all part of the excitement. Engaging with a trusted colleague, industry mentor or external coach can go a long way to help you debrief, frame your thinking and correct your course when needed.

 

Spare a Thought for Your Boss

Bosses are people first and foremost. Until we’re ready to walk in their shoes, we should do everything we can to fulfill our responsibilities as a positive member of their team. Respect their role, make a point of getting to know them and be a proactive, positive resource for them.

 

Seek to Understand, Rather than Be Understood & Be a Good ‘Follower’

If you’re not gelling with your boss despite your best efforts, or if the nature of the work or the direction in which they are leading the business is unreasonable, then follow the existing policies and procedures to reconcile or leave. Take responsibility for You Inc. and move on.

Life’s too short.

By the same token, be patient, chat with a trusted friend or colleague and gain a little perspective before it goes too far.

The 2020 environment of rapid change, increasing use of AI and high-speed pressures on start-ups are placing real demands on founders and teams. If you have been used to working in mainstream environments or industries over the past 20-30 years you may come face to face with discomfort and demands for better performance and an innovative, driven approach to sales.

 

If You’re the Boss, Then Be a Good One

Authority used wrongly – You’re the boss so don’t lord it over people. It is not about control or intimidation. It should be about serving one another, in love, using every available attribute to make a difference on the planet.

The jobs we fill do not determine our worth. Be aware of finding the right balance between being task-focused and people-driven.

Authority used rightly You exercise consultation and inclusivity as appropriate. You demonstrate clear boundaries. You don’t shy away from the tough calls. While you ruffle some feathers, your workplace is the right place for you and if you have up-line support, then you feel safe to make the tough calls, knowing you are backed.

Role status – Your title and society status doesn’t guarantee popularity, loyalty or respect. In High Society, Grace Kelly’s last film in 1956 before becoming the Princess of Monaco, her character Tracy Samantha Lord endearingly, if somewhat naively, asks, ‘Everybody loves me, don’t they?’

Obviously, Tracy has not taken the time to consider how others see her beyond her socio-economic standing and family name. In your workplace, if you’re gaining your value from your title or perceived status, then it’s not sustainable. Like Tracy, you may need a few friends to challenge your awareness of self and others.

You will probably polarise your colleagues and team from time to time. That’s the nature of disruption and promoting accountability. It’s not unreasonable to want your colleagues to show up, turn on and do the work.

 

Imagine if your team and colleagues were all on the same page? Grab Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” When You Order it Here!

 

Care enough to confront – Have robust conversations with one another. Distinguish between attacks against people versus the pursuit of clarifying practices and processes before taking the criticism personally.

Not everyone will understand you – shocking, isn’t it? Well, it can be pretty crazy. Work with a mentor or a coach to keep a clear perspective and reveal any blind spots you may have.

Tough calls – As a boss, I’ve had to make decisions that not everyone agreed with and some that I wish I could have avoided. I’ve rolled out corporate objectives after rigorous debate behind closed doors with senior colleagues and I’ve challenged staff to grow and be accountable for their actions.

In one role, leading my region through redundancies, program closures and expansions, I leveraged my networks, worked with an executive coach, used creative problem-solving, extended reporting deadlines, challenged innuendo and gossip, had the courage of my convictions, stopped rescuing people, reassessed the culture of the organisation, reflected on what I’d learnt, what I’d contributed and those I admired, before giving myself permission to walk away.

That’s a tough call when you’re loyal.

If you’re finding the season you’re in as a leader a little tough, then put some external support strategies in place, test your communication strategies, tweak a few things and make sure you’re accountable to have a good work-life balance!

Leading Millennials & Centennials

If you’re leading a generation of Millennials and Centennials, then stay clear on your values and organisational alignment. Be consistent with your behavioural expectations. Use language and interactive training sessions that share the big ‘WHY’ and bring them on the journey with you. To be compelling is to captivate and promote unity and action across all generations within the workplace.

I’ve worked with some great bosses and some not so great. I’m a mum and a step-mum to four women. I am inspired by some of the bosses my girls have had and absolutely aghast at some of their others.

I have seen high school leavers burn out because of unrealistic expectations from a fast food restaurant that would have 18-year-olds wake at 3am to start at 4am without any training on how to adjust to shift work.

I’ve seen ‘pop-up’ shop owners in shopping malls refuse to provide 18-year-olds with a break during a 12-hour shift. The kids are fearful they won’t be offered further hours so they don’t make a fuss.

As parents, we want our children to have good boundaries and to develop their negotiation skills. We also want employers to uphold the laws of the land and honour their team members with appropriate care and mutual respect, not only because it is the law but because it is the right thing to do!

In 2016 and 2017, Mr Marsh pursued Australian company Bakers Delight to address their unfair Certified Agreement after his daughter brought to his attention the pay rates she and many under-18s were receiving.^2

The courage of Mr Marsh’s convictions and willingness to step into the debate with the company generated national media attention and public outcry which led to a report in The Age highlighting the company had agreed to remove the Certified Agreement.5

 

Imagine if your team and colleagues were all on the same page? Grab Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” When You Order it Here!

 

Fruits of the Spirit | A Counter-Cultural Way to Lead if You’re Combining Faith and Works

Written about 2000 years ago in the Letter to the Galatians, the country of modern-day Turkey, Paul the Apostle shares the Fruits of the Spirit. It’s a list of qualities not often associated with job descriptions of aspiring leaders and C-suite executives, yet they are the very same character and behavioural traits that enduring influencers embody.

The qualities are: love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.^3 Which one could you demonstrate more of to be compelling and maintain long-term perspective?

  • Love – Look for the gold in every person. You’ve likely heard the verse at weddings.

 

  • Joy – Look for it in the pursuit of your long-term Don’t get hung up on the short-term problems.

 

  • Peace – This comes through the hope and trust that it is all going to turn out well.

 

  • Forbearance – Patiently hang in there with others and lean on your faith because heaven knows sometimes you just need an extra bit of help!

 

  • Kindness and Gentleness – Seek to understand one another with gentleness, sincere love and truthful speech.

 

  • Goodness – Boldly do good towards all people and have the faith-filled mindset that goodness follows you.

 

  • Faithfulness – A consistent belief and trust in God, during every season of your leadership, which inspires confidence and dependability in others.

 

  • Self-control – It’s about more than not losing your cool and avoiding conflict. Rather, it is to be caring enough to confront with diligence, virtue, knowledge, boundaries, endurance, godliness, brotherly kindness and love.

 

Consider doing a weekend word study on each of the fruits. Go back to the original Greek and Hebrew meanings to explore their relevance to you and how you lead.

 

Wish your boss was different? Or your staff were better? Maybe, just maybe we could all be better versions of ourselves. Grab Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” When You Order it Here!

 

Your Boss Checklist

 

  • Communicate the ‘WHY’: use different mediums to reach the various players.
  • Care for your people: know what’s important to them, have regular check-ins, look for the opportunities to hear what’s working well and find out if they may be up against something unfamiliar. Believe the best in them.
  • Be accountable: get a coach! Pay for it yourself or seek input from your employer. Professional development may be a tax deduction on your annual income return so check with your accountant.
  • Stop solely relying on emails: guard against the overuse of technology. Pick up the phone and talk to people or see them face to face. Why? Your team members may feel more valued when you do.
  • Check your boundaries: switch off that technology at a set time each evening and don’t turn it on again until a pre-arranged time the next morning. If you’re on call, develop your own personal boundaries regarding accessibility. You do not want that message light flicking at you or your spouse during those midnight hours!
  • Make diary notes: backup what you say in phone calls by using a quick diary note. Use the voice memo function on your phone and email it to yourself or your PA. Don’t over complicate things.
  • Share the load: ask for help when you need it. Don’t be a martyr by taking it all on. Expect everyone to grow during a period of expansion.
  • Review your ‘fit’ for the role: are you growing with the position and the changing requirements?

 

Are you in agreement with the direction of the business? Are you role-modelling unity and inspiring your team moving forward? Are you able to have robust conversations and respectful debate without fear?

 

Be compelling: be someone they know, like and trust.

 

Imagine if your team and colleagues were all on the same page? Grab Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” When You Order it Here!

 

Footnotes:
^1.Business Dictionary, boss, http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/boss.html

^2. Toscano, N. & Danckert, S., 1 January 2017, ‘Bakers Delight faces legal challenge over wages’, The Age, http://bit.ly/TAP-UnfairCertifiedAgreement

^3. New Testament Galatians 5:22–23 (NIV) Leading with Faith in Action. Combining Faith and Works

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

About the Author- Tarran Deane the Alphabet Principle Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader for Real Life at Work - Speaker, Keynote COnference Speaker, PCO Speaker, MICE Speaker, Bureau Speaker, Associations SpeakerTarran Deane is the Author of “The Alphabet Principle ~ Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader, for Real Life@Work”. With executive and leadership experience, covering more than 41,000 hours, across human services, workforce planning, associations and peak bodies, along with banking and tourism, Tarran has spoken at conferences and events in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the United States of America, on strategic and operational elements of Leadership, Communication, Change Management, Diversity, Inclusion and Engagements.

As a wife, mum & step-mum, Tarran loves the tapestry of family life and recharges by serving others, chilling out and racing her Ducati 800 Monster through the hills of Northern NSW.

 

 

How you lead people impacts them. Lead them well. Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” When You Order it Here!

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100 Days to Christmas and It Just Got a Whole Lot Easier to Give!

It’s Saturday and I Realised We Have 100 Days to Make Sure We’ve Remembered Everyone this Christmas!

We don’t want you stressed as you run full tilt towards the end of the year.

We can hear you now, wondering how you’re going to finalise your calendars for the rest of the year, close out all the tasks, fill the vacancies, lead change and choose the right speaker for your 2017-2020 conference. Not to mention the cries of “I don’t know what gifts to buy for friends, colleagues, clients, customers and family!”

 

Take a breath. You’ve got this!

 

Leading Executives, Experts, Entrepreneurs, Managers and Leaders, we’ve got you sorted with Tarran’s latest book, “The Alphabet Principle ~ Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader”.

 

Resourced with 26 thought-provoking, checklists, tips and template links, The Alphabet Principle will refresh, ignite and launch both the new and seasoned leader, ready for the year ahead!

 

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TarranDeane.com Leadership & Life Store – Tarran is a Keynote Speaker, Executive Coach, Online Leadership Course Host, Commentator & Author of “The Alphabet Principle~ Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader”, making this book the perfect gift this Christmas!

 

We’d be delighted to make your life a whole lot easier and in turn, this Christmas especially meaningful for you.

 

Select Your Book or Other Training Resources Here

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Let's Get Giving

 

Quick – the clock’s ticking! Let’s Make it Count!

2017.09.16 Saturday – 100 Days til Christmas

  • 2017.09.23 Saturday – 093 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.09.30 Saturday – 086 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.10.07 Saturday – 079 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.10.14 Saturday – 072 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.10.21 Saturday – 065 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.10.28 Saturday – 058 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.11.04 Saturday – 051 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.11.11 Saturday – 044 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.11.18 Saturday – 037 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.11.25 Saturday – 030 Days til Christmas
  • 2017.12.02 Saturday – 023 Days til Christmas
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2017.12.25 Monday – Christmas Day 0! It’s Here!

 

Let’s be ready to GIVE this Christmas and beyond!

 

 

Select Your Book or Other Training Resources Here

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Let's Get Giving

 

A. Authentic – An Extract from The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader by Tarran Deane

A. Authentic Leadership

 

adj. AUTHENTIC: not false or copied; genuine; real; reliable; trustworthy; having the origin supported by unquestionable evidence; entitled to acceptance or belief because of agreement with known facts or experience; authenticated; verified.1

 

When we speak the seed of value over the lives we are entrusted with, a root of quiet confidence begins its journey of conviction into the battlefield of the mind. The seed is watered, valiantly breaking new ground in the face of discouragement and word storms. The leader emerges to stand not in the shadows cast by others, but rather to turn her own face to the sun, certain of her place in the world.

– Tarran Deane

 

Just Who Are You?

The rise of social media has led to a shifting of real and perceived authenticity. People post with certain filters. They’re now able to tag the topic and context of their post in their personal profiles. As workplaces are increasingly disrupted by automation and shifting goal posts, the leader who has a clear sense of his or her identity and is able to articulate it with word and deed.

 

As a compelling leader, you can inspire your team, tribe or community by providing opportunities to others to:

  • understand individual strengths and inspire personal accountability
  • promote unity and share the vision
  • require peak performance and set clear expectations
  • rejoice in the outcomes
  • honour the role of family in the life of the team.

 

Oh, Have You Got Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” Yet? Click Here to Order a Copy for You and a Colleague!

 

Strip Back the Layers

It takes significant courage to lead from a clearly-stated values position in mainstream organisations. Those who do set themselves apart from the competition are fine with knowing they risk polarising some folks at work and in their target market.

So, get your brave on. Step into a higher level of personal satisfaction. Encourage your people to identify their values and take responsibility to genuinely declare the company principles or values as ‘this is how we do things around here’. is possible to be a compelling leader who has a clear vision whether you wear a pair of jeans or a pin-striped suit. It is less about what you wear and more about the vision you sow and the difference you’ll make.

Is it possible to be a compelling authentic leader who has a clear vision whether you wear a pair of jeans or a pin-striped suit? It is less about what you wear and more about the vision you sow and the difference you’ll make. Like walking your talk.

 

This takes time. I’ve read excerpts from The Four-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss2 and thought at the time that every workplace has its own context. There’s no way I could have cut down my executive hours working in Human Services.

Authentic Leadership doesn’t demand you throw in the towel and join a start-up or ridicule policies and procedures that are their for your protection and quality outcomes for the business.  If you try to fake who you are or your preferred work style, then you may well live on coupons and go around the mountain a few more times before you realise that:

  • work is a noble pursuit and you don’t have to leave your job to be entrepreneurial
  • you may not have to leave your own business and ‘get a real job’ either
  • to serve in the shadows can be more rewarding and influential than being in the spotlight
  • relationships matter – it is important to be kind to one another, set clear boundaries and expect more of each other and yourself.

 

Wouldn’t life be easier if everyone on your team kindly respected each other’s differences and yet came together under ONE Vision? Let’s help you to help them be the best version of themselves. Buy Tarran’s book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” here and we’ll send it right to you!

 

What’s the Alternative?

Often we need someone close to us or with an objective viewpoint who can challenge us if it looks like we’re ‘faking it’ or self-sabotaging. Blind spots, unconscious bias, lack of personal accountability and a readiness to blame are incredibly short-sighted and could exacerbate tensions with family and work colleagues.

If we’re afraid to pull back the layers and shy away from encouraging our people to do the same, then we may begin to see an increase in:

  • workplace conflicts
  • disengaged personnel
  • individual burnouts and mental health issues
  • loss of credibility and influence
  • loss of intellectual property
  • union involvement
  • lack of succession planning
  • loss of top talent.

 

 

Trust through Transparency and Track Record

The case is strong. You’re most compelling as a leader when you’re comfortable in your own skin and committed to learning, giving your best, bringing others on the journey with you, honouring commitments and keeping the lines of communication open.

Your life experience within your community, current industry or volunteer service will continue to shape you. Spend time to reflect on your achievements and celebrate the person you have become. Encourage yourself and be mindful that the person you become in pursuit of a goal is often as important as the goal itself.

Your team will be watching. Sometimes, it will seem like the whole world is watching how you move and respond to changes and confrontations. A lousy attitude hurts your health and limits your opportunities.

 

 

 

If you want to go far and go together, then navigate the tension of likeability while embracing the principle of ‘It’s none of my business what other people think of me’. Your language expresses a confidence of personal conviction and teachability, leading from a position of boldness and humility.

 

Vision – What Are You Aiming For?

Our values become clearer when we’ve come face to face with what we don’t want. Over time, were confronted with the opportunity to become better or bitter. Compelling leaders choose to become better, to develop a thirst for finding the good in other people, to pursue a cause greater than themselves and to delight in the simple things. See chapter V. – Vision.

 

Buy Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader” & We’ll Send it Right to You!

 

Serving One Another – Become Better at It

If I am ever stuck or become increasingly tired and forget who I am and what I’m meant to be doing, then I am too busy in my ‘doing’.

Personally, I get on my knees and read the Good Book. I spend a bit of time reading my favourite passages of the Bible, listening to worship music and recharging my soul and gaining a fresh perspective on the challenges at hand.

 

Your Authenticity Checklist

Here are a few questions to ask yourself. Oh, and they’re great questions to use when you’re coaching a direct report as well.

 

  • What makes you happy or sad?
  • What ticks you off or inspires you?
  • How do you like to process information?
  • How do you like to connect with people?
  • Close your eyes and reflect on the company you Are those people encouraging you to be a better person, personally and professionally?
  • Do you understand why you like to work the way you do? Consider undertaking a work-preference style assessment with an accredited facilitator so you can gain a deeper understanding.3
  • Watch the old movie Runaway Bride and ask yourself, How do I really like my eggs? What sort of woman am I? What kind of man am I? What can I do better? Do I use banter in a harmful manner that erodes another person’s confidence?
  • Create a Timeline of Events and update it Record the date and the nature of your feelings about various key events in your life and the lessons learned.

 

 

 

You can no longer justify yourself by saying, ‘It’s just the way I am!’ or ‘This happened to me when I was younger.’

If you are self-righteous, rude, have a problem dealing with anger and avoid taking responsibility for yourself, then your time is up. You’ve been outed. Get help from your local doctor, healthcare professional or career coach.

Real Leaders understand the impact they have and are wisely responsible AND Authentic.

Be the real version of you on your best day.

 

That’s Authentic Leadership.

 

 

Be the Best Version of You. Buy Your Copy of Tarran’s Book “The Alphabet Principle: Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader”. It’s Time for You to Shine and Stand Up for What You Believe In!

 

Footnotes:

  1. Dictionary.com, Authentic, http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/authentic
  2. The 4-Hour Workweek, http://fourhourworkweek.com/
  3. Visit https://www.tarrandeane.com and work with us!

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

About the Author- Tarran Deane the Alphabet Principle Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader for Real Life at Work - Speaker, Keynote COnference Speaker, PCO Speaker, MICE Speaker, Bureau Speaker, Associations SpeakerTarran Deane is the Author of “The Alphabet Principle ~ Your A-Z Guide to Being a Compelling Leader, for Real Life@Work”. With executive and leadership experience, covering more than 41,000 hours, across human services, non profits, workforce planning, associations and peak bodies, along with banking and tourism, Tarran has spoken at conferences and events in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the United States on strategic and operational elements of Leadership, Communication, Change Management, Diversity, Inclusion and Workforce Engagement.

As a wife, mum & step-mum, Tarran loves the tapestry of family life and recharges by serving others, chilling out and racing her Ducati 800 Monster through the hills of Northern NSW.